So the thing I’ve been toiling over for 2 years— this is the first person who bought it!


After two years of work, EAT IT is back from the printer!


I produced and hosted the first EAT IT podcast!



I’m going to try to talk more about things I care about

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Heyyyyy there friendly people with thinking heads,


Hello! It’s been a long day, hasn’t it? Tell me about it! That was nice, but enough about you.


I’ve decided it’s time I start talking more, here, and in general, about the things that I care about and the things that matter to me. I’m sure I could craft some heart-rending essay about how I came to this realization but I know this internet thing is all about the shortness and squishiness so let’s ask this long-winded lady writer to do her best to cut the NPR-style personal story and get to the meat:


I’ve been thinking a lot about how disenfranchised I feel. I vote, but none of the specific issues I care about seem to be acknowledged or respected by any of the people who represent me. And as a result, many of the things I care about seem to be disappearing or at risk. It makes me so angry I can’t even talk about it in person, because I simultaneously feel rage and ‘What’s the point?’


And while I may not have a clear manifesto or doctrine or political alliance (or really any political knowlege to speak of— mama’s a pretty Naive Nancy over here and my ideas are all pretttty basic), I do know when something upsets me or makes me happy.


And, actually, it’s kind of my fault if I don’t talk about when those things happen in a more public way. Because then the people who represent me will DEFINITELY not know what I care about.


So I’m going to start talking about them. I’m going to start *trying* to engage in discussion with my representatives (political, cultural, other)— and not in a shrieky or demanding or shrill kind of way. First, because that’s not my style, but second, because that’s no way to ask someone to fight for something you believe in! Y’know? I am just going to level with them. Talk with them. Let them do their job of hearing me as I also do my own job of voicing my thoughts and concerns.

I’m going to start talking here and on the Twitter and whatnot about things that bother me and things I’m pleased about and I’m not going to try to be witty or ironic or clever about it. I have to be clear. And then, if still nobody cares about what I think is worth acknowledging or protecting or fighting for, I’ll know it wasn’t my fault for not stating things clearly enough.

So that is all. Oh, except for that also I think I’m going to extend this gesture from politics and culture straight through to restaurant reviews. Going to be jibba-jabbering lots more. So you can look forward to that, rather than me just sitting here quietly stewing about the fate of our world. That, and more restaurant reviews. Boom.

And by the way YES I realize this is all painfully earnest. May I remind you that I tried, and failed, to launch an earnestness movement several years ago. So don’t act so surprised!


newyorker:

The Museum of Food and Drink’s Dave Arnold explores the origins of breakfast cereal with the puffing gun: http://nyr.kr/13yFrud

Okay, this is just getting creepy. I was already having the kind of day where you feel all weirdo because a word you’ve never heard before/haven’t thought of in a long time popped up twice. It was ‘burdock.’ The name of the street my grandparents lived on. Also an ingredient in a new tea I’m trying. Also saw it on a menu for a Korean place I won’t be going to tonight because it closes too early. Then I started searching for nearby restaurants open past 8pm and— BLAMMO— BURDOCK A THIRD TIME! This time in a very intriguing recipe: pulled burdock burrito at Live Food Bar in the Annex. Anyhoo.

The other night I was munching on some bedtime cereal, as you do. I recently decided to buy Froot Loops. It was a total act of whimsy. But then I became immediately obsessed with them. I had them for breakfast, after work, before bed. I think the sugar in them was totally addicting, as I’m not normally the kind of lady to eat sugar cereal. (Usually my breakfast is oatmeal.) Anyway, I thought perhaps a tiny baby step towards a more healthy way of being, or at least a baby step away from being addicted to Froot Loops, was to buy Multigrain Cheerios instead. I know they’re also full of sugar, but at least they don’t have all the freaky colourings, so they must be a smidge better in that way. From there, I’d phase out the sugar cereals to go straight back to regular Cheerios, and from there, SEE YOU LATER SHORT-LIVED BUT FRIGHTENING KIDS CEREAL ADDICTION. I laugh in your face, Toucan Sam. Ha! Ha!


So there I was, prepping for bed with a little crunchy delight of Multigrain Cheerios when I wondered, out loud, to the disinterest of my boyfriend, “How do they make Cheerios?”

"They mash up grain paste and shoot it into a mould," he said, crushing my child-like wonder. (It was late. He was tired. He gets a free pass.)


But that couldn’t be it, could it? “But the sides of the Cheerio aren’t sharp edges, like you’d get with a mould,” I protested. We had no answer.

And then here I come onto the Tumblr to talk about something completely different and what do I see before me but a video explaining HOW THEY MAKE PUFFED BREAKFAST CEREAL.

Okay there is some serious juju going around in the atmosphere right now. And that juju is friends with my detox tea and also with historical food videos from the New Yorker. And it wants me to eat cereal and burdock-laden treats and I am pretty much okay with that.


Designing “Lolita”

newyorker:

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Rachel Arons writes about the challenges of capturing “Lolita” in a single image, and a new book that commissioned designers to create covers for Nabokov’s work. Click-through for a slide show of a selection of covers: http://nyr.kr/11xdKnr

Cover design by Aleksander Bak. Image courtesy Print Books.


slaughterhouse90210:

“That’s why people take vacations. Not to relax or find excitement or see new places. To escape the death that exists in routine things.”
― Don DeLillo, White Noise

slaughterhouse90210:

“That’s why people take vacations. Not to relax or find excitement or see new places. To escape the death that exists in routine things.”

― Don DeLillo, White Noise


How many hours a week do you read? (via Hours spent reading books around the world)

How many hours a week do you read? (via Hours spent reading books around the world)